Flood

TRMM (PR)

Disaster Cycle Phase: 

  • Preparedness

Space Technology/Product and Application: 

  • Precipitation forecast
  • EO/RS

Field of Application: 

  • Flood
  • Disaster Type

Satellite: 

Undefined

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

IRS-1C, 1D (WiFS)

Disaster Cycle Phase: 

  • Mitigation

Space Technology/Product and Application: 

  • Inundation Map
  • EO/RS

Field of Application: 

  • Flood
  • Disaster Type

Satellite: 

Undefined

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Recommended Practice: Flood Hazard Mapping

English

Teaser Recommended Practice: 

The UN-SPIDER Recommended Practice on flood hazard mapping shows how GIS and modelling are used to calculate simulated inundation areas based on land use, soil, elevation, and meteorological data. Flood simulations can be used to support decision-making regarding potential land use changes. This step-by-step procedure was developed by the Lyes School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University, United States of America. The model presented below has been applied to the Cedar Creek watershed, but could be applied to any watershed as long as the necessary data (e.g. land cover, digital elevation model, soil information) are available.

Flowchart Recommended Practices: 

Logo 2: 

Objective: 

Flood prediction and modeling refers to the processes of transformation of rainfall into a flood hydrograph and to the translation of that hydrograph throughout a watershed or any other hydrologic system. In this context, the aim of this Practice is providing guidance in how to determine the extension of flooded areas by using hydro data model together with powerful GIS tools used to model flood hazards (i.e.Geo HEC-HMS).

Disaster Cycle Phase: 

  • Mitigation
  • Preparedness

Main Hazards: 

  • Flood

Test Site: 

Cedar Creek watershed/ St. Joseph basin, northeast Indiana, USA

Context: 

The Cedar Creek is located in northeast Indiana, USA. It is the largest tributary to the St. Joseph river. Soil types on the watershed were formed from compacted glacial till and fluvial materials. The predominate soil textures in the immediate Cedar Creek are silt loam, silty clay loam, and clay loam. The average annual precipitation in the watershed is approximately 900mm. The average temperature during crop growth seasons ranges from 10 to 23 degrees . Approximately 76% of the watershed area is agriculture, 21% forested lands, and 3% urban. The majority of the agricultural lands are rotationally tilled predominantly with corn and soybeans, with lesser amounts of wheat and hay (cf. Larose et al. 2007).

Applicability: 

The model has been applied to the Cedar Creek watershed. In general, it could be applied to any watershed as long as the necessary data (e.g. land cover, digital elevation model, soil information) are available.

Recommended Practice: Radar-based Flood Mapping

English

Teaser Recommended Practice: 

The UN-SPIDER Recommended Practice on radar-based flood mapping explains the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite imagery for flood mapping. The practice shows the use of the European Space Agency's (ESA) SNAP software for pre-processing and processing of SAR imagery using a threshold method for deriving the flood extent. Google Earth is used to visualize the results of the image processing. This practice was developed by the Space Research Institute NASU-SSAU, Ukraine, a UN-SPIDER Regional Support Office. This practice can be applied globally and has been used successfully for floods in Australia, Africa and Asia.

Flowchart Recommended Practices: 

Objective: 

The objective of this practice is to determine the extent of flooded areas. The use of SAR satellite imagery for flood extent mapping constitutes a viable solution to process images quickly, providing near real-time flooding information to relief agencies. Moreover, flood extent information can be used for damage assessment and risk management creating scenarios showing potential population, economic activities and the environment at potential risk from flooding,

Disaster Cycle Phase: 

  • Relief & Response

Main Hazards: 

  • Flood

Test Site: 

Malawi

Context: 

The practice was applied to the flood event in Malawi in January 2015. Since December 2014, heavy rains affected Malawi causing rivers to overflow. The recommended practices was applied to an affected area in the Nsanje district around Chiromo.

Applicability: 

This practice can be applied globally. It has been applied successfully for floods in Australia, Africa and Asia. The precondition for SAR water detection is a smooth water surface. False alarm can occur in areas of radar shadow due to variable terrain. False alarm can also occur with smooth objects like roads and sand. Flood detection in urban areas remains difficult. The detection of flooded vegetation from SAR imagery requires a different approach using two multi-temporal images.

Flooded areas determination using radar satellite images in Slovenia 2010

 

English

Bibliographic reference: 

T. Veljanovski et al. (2011). Flooded areas determination using radar satellite images in Slovenia 2010. Proc. of the ESA-EUSC-JRC 2011, Image Information Mining conference. paper 34, p. 141-144

The OPERA project: EO-based flood risk management in Italy

 

External Contact Person: 

Giorgio Boni

Email: 

giorgio.boni [at] cimafoundation.org
English

Bibliographic reference: 

G. Boni et al. (2009). The OPERA project: EO-based flood risk management in Italy. Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2009 IEEE International, IGARSS 2009. 12-17 July 2009. Volume: 2, Page(s): II-929 - II-932

Health impacts of floods in Europe. Data gaps and information needs from a spatial perspective

 

English

Bibliographic reference: 

Jakubicka, T.; Vos, F.; Phalkey, R.; Guha-Sapir, D.; Marx, M. (2010). Health impacts of floods in Europe: data gaps and information needs from a spatial perspective. Catholic University of Louvain. Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED)/Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg. Institut für Public Health: Heidelberg. 41 pp.

Analysis of Lidar Elevation Data for Improved Identification and Delineation of Lands Vulnerable to Sea-Level Rise

 

External Contact Person: 

Dean B. Gesch

Email: 

gesch [at] usgs.gov
English

Bibliographic reference: 

Gesch, D.B., 2009. Analysis of lidar elevation data for improved identification and delineation of lands vulnerable to sea-level rise.
Journal of Coastal Research, SI(53), 49–58.

TRMM (TMI)

Disaster Cycle Phase: 

  • Preparedness
  • Preparedness

Space Technology/Product and Application: 

  • Precipitation forecast
  • Precipitation forecast
  • EO/RS
  • EO/RS

Field of Application: 

  • Flood
  • Flood
  • Disaster Type
  • Disaster Type

Satellite: 

English

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Advancing Extreme Weather Monitoring from Space: From TRMM to GPM

 

English

Bibliographic reference: 

D. Kirschbaum, A. Hou (2011). Advancing Extreme Weather Monitoring from Space: From TRMM to GPM. Earthzine, posted on April 18th, 2011 in Articles, Earth Observation, Extreme Weather

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